Sunday, February 25, 2018

Bruce Hopper I was playing with the Omen which had horns the summer of 1967 at the Beach Club opening for the Prieces of Eight. After our six week run was over, Mike Hatchett our drummer brought Hendrix’s Are you Experienced to practice. Out went the horns and we psychadelicized our name to the Omen and Our Luv and never played white soul music again. Summer of 1968 we were back in PC wearing Nehru jackets with strobe lights etc. what a difference a year makes!

Friday, February 23, 2018

I've never been in psychotherapy but I've watched all six seasons of the SOPRANOS so I know all I need to know about psychology and so much psychology has to do with dreams. There's one of Tony Soprano's dreams where he thinks he's talking to his therapist, Dr. Melfi, who has her back to him and as she turns around Tony sees that the person in Dr. Melfi's chair and is really HIS OWN MAMA! Boy, that was a scary one because everybody knows TONY'S MAMA is the biggest villain of the whole show! Heck, Rolling Stone named her as the NUMBER 3 GREATEST TV VILLAINS OF ALL TIME! Now my Mama wasn't that bad but when it came to her little boy, ME, getting drunk at the Old Dutch, she could get pretty bad. Let me give you a little background on how my Mama and the OLD DUTCH began to inhabit my dreams so many years ago. I can't recall a time in my life when I didn't know about the Old Dutch. My grandparents probably partied there. I know my parents did and I did. My personal experience began during the week of my 1968 high school graduation. I ended up in the parking lot of the Old Dutch because some guys from Vandy had told us that Joe South was going to perform that night. I didn't make it inside the club that night but one year later Joe South had become a superstar with the success of his GAMES PEOPLE PLAY and during the summer of '69 I finally became a patron of the Old Dutch. (A year at BAMA had taught me all I needed to know about acquiring a fake ID but that's another topic and I don't wanna digress). During the summer of  '69, '70 and '71, I'd come home from college, live at my parents' home in Dothan, work some job and save money for another year of college. It was tough to live as you pleased while you were off at college and then have to come home and knuckle under to Mom and Dad, be real conservative with your money and work hard all day, every day. Even a mule don't work all the time and we college kids needed a place on the weekends where we could come to blow off some steam and the Old Dutch fit the bill, especially the Sunday afternoon jam sessions. I got so brazen that after one Sunday afternoon listening to Wilbur Walton, Jr. at a jam session, I drove back home to Dothan in time to have supper with my folks. I don't know what happened at supper but I must have slurred my words and Mama hollered, "Bob, you are just PLAIN DRUNK!", "No, Ma'am, I'm not," I replied, "I've just been on the beach all afternoon and I am very, very tired." "You're not tired," she said,"You're just PLAIN DRUNK!" Well, I excused myself from the table and went to my room. Mama followed me, hollering and screaming. I sat on the edge of my bed and listened to Mama holler until Daddy came in and put his arm around her shoulder and said, "Come on, honey, leave him alone. He's tired." and he and Mama left me and went back to the kitchen. Simple as that. No more trouble. Well what does that have to do with the psychology of dreams? Well, see back then I had this recurring dream where I'd be just about to do something REALLY IMPORTANT in my dream and my Mama would come into the dream and interrupt me. This became a big problem in the world of dreams inside my head. I think the Rolling Stones wrote a song about it called, "I CAN'T GET NO SATISFACTION." Well, after the big OLD DUTCH SUNDAY AFTERNOON JAM SESSION FIGHT IN ROBERT REGISTER'S CHILDHOOD BEDROOM, I had this recurring dream again where I'm doing something REALLY IMPORTANT and then Mama shows up. Right at that moment, Daddy came into my dream and put his arm around her shoulder and he said, "Come on, honey, leave him alone. He's tired."and guess what? I've never had that bad dream again. So, Bingo! At a very young age, my experiences at the Old Dutch helped to free my psyche and to rid myself of a recurring nightmare.

 For over 35 years, the OLD DUTCH served the public on Panama City Beach and its story is the story of the building itself, its owners, its managers, its hospitality workers, its patrons, its musicians and a host of other entertainers including emcees, comedians, dancers, acrobats and more. It's the story of three generations begun by our grandparents generation, enjoyed by our parents and finally in it's heyday, the pow-wow grounds for the weekend rebellions of Gulf Coast Baby Boomers.

In the article I wrote about the Old Dutch in Panama City Living Magazine five years ago, I said that the builder of the Old Dutch, Frank S. Burghduff came to the Bay County beaches from Sylvan Beach, N.Y., in 1936.

Looking back at it, I have no idea where I came up with that "Sylvan Beach, N.Y." as Burghduff's northern home. He definitely had connections to the eastern shore of Oneida Lake where Sylvan Beach is located. When Burghduff  arrived in Bay County, he was married to the former Etta Skaden of Canastota, N.Y. Sylvan Beach on Oneida Lake is less than ten miles from Canastota. Etta died in 1939 at a Dothan hospital and she's buried in Greenwood Cemetery. There are no birth or death dates on the Burghduff grave markers. "Husband and Pal" is carved on Frank's and "Wife and Pal" is carved on Etta's.  As for Burghduff arriving in 1936. I ain't so sure where I came up with that either. I'm pretty sure I considered Burghduff's public statement published in the News-Herald on Monday, January 12 and Tuesday, January 13, 1942. In this denial of his being a Nazi spy, Burghduff wrote, "I came to Panama City seven years ago and liked the city so much I returned one year later and built the Old Dutch Tavern on the Coastal Highway west of Panama City." That puts Burgduff's arrival in Panama City as January of 1935 and his return to the beaches as 1936. There are a few other clues about Burghduff's arrival in Florida. A "For Sale" want ad for the Old Dutch printed in January of 1944 claimed that the tavern had been "established 8 years."  That comes out as 1936. A November '48 St. Pete newspaper article,announced that Frank was opening a sandwich shop in Largo. The article stated, "Burghduff is a veteran hotel man, having spent 40 years in business for himself. He retired in 1942 and has been making his home at Madeira Beach for several years. Fifteen years have been spent in Florida." So that statement puts him in Florida all the way back to '33. The part about "veteran hotel man" is interesting. In June 1940 Frank ran a want ad that said "Hotel,- New, Built only two years; also one of the finest night clubs" . In the same ad he also stated, "Will sell in 60 days on account of death in family." This was nine months after Etta's death. Could the hotel have been the Sea Breeze?This old hotel, the first to have hot and cold running water on the beach, had been Frank's headquarters on the beach. An March 1940 want-ad Frank ran to sell his 19 and a half foot long house trailer states that the trailer was parked at the Sea Breeze and Frank implied that he could be contacted there. Bill Holloway who owned the Sea Breeze had been a pall bearer at Etta Burghduff's funeral and in June of 1940, the News-Herald reported that Frank had hosted a birthday party for Mrs. Bill Holloway at the Sea Breeze. Is it possible that the Holloway family has more details about the Burghduffs?

In my 2013 PANAMA CITY LIVING article I wrote: "When you walked into the barroom of The Old Dutch, you felt as if you’d just stepped into a rustic Florida roadhouse time capsule lifted out of some Forties film noir classic. The bare cypress log walls were covered with various clocks, curios and stuffed hunting and fishing trophies; all crowned with a high ceiling of exposed rough cypress beams. As you entered you faced a huge stone fireplace, constructed from 113 tons of rock that could burn logs five feet long. The anchor of the old 160 ft. coastal freighter, Tarpon, sunk off Phillips Inlet in 1937, stood mounted on the mantelpiece. To the left was the unpolished bar made of cypress lumber and blackened by the tobacco and whiskey it had dispensed since 1940." 

(picture of the mantle and fireplace)
You can make out the painting of the Old Dutch scroll on the mantle of the fireplace. 
Even though this fireplace was demolished in 1976, it was constructed about the same time as the large fireplaces at the Camp Helen Lodge so clues as to the Old Dutch fireplace's construction might still be found in structures still standing in Bay County.
(picture of the painting of the Old Dutch scroll)
This now hangs in the Stiles' beachhouse. Notice that Burghduff is misspelled.
The location of the steamship Tarpon's anchor is unknown.
(want ad for the Old Dutch bar)
In August of 1981, this want ad appeared in a Pensacola paper so there is hope that one day the Old Dutch's original bar will be located

Burghduff was also early officer in the Gulf Coast Scenic Highway Association and as secretary he announced in an article in the May 12, 1941 News-Herald that a dog fly eradication program would be brought before a meeting of the group. A search of the Internet revealed this 1941 letter written by USDA entomologist Walter White to his wife. White had been transferred to Panama City to work on the dog fly eradication program and he writes his wife:
 August 18, 1941 "Sunday night I drove to the Old Dutch Tavern for a steak. It was fair and I met Mr. Bergdorf who had a collection of heads and skins from Alaska. I found that he had spent about the same amount of time up there as you and I. He went north from Fairbanks to Point Barrow. I drove back by Panama City Beach and listened to Mr. Weir toot his trumpet. He isn’t as good as Walter White thinks he is." http://walterandina.com/archives/tag/entomology.html

So here we learn where Burghduff may have collected his "hundreds of curios from all over the world." Burghduff's Old Dutch advertisements announced, "Don't fail to bring your friends to see the $10,000 exhibit of curios from all over the world free of charge."

The blackouts and gasoline rationing of WWII hurt Frank's business but as early as June of 1940, Burghduff was running want ads putting the Old Dutch up for sale. In 1944, he and Hotel Dixie-Sherman owner Cliff Stiles struck a deal.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

From a 1942 ad,"Don't fail to bring your friends to see the $10,000 exhibit of curios from all over the world, free of charge."

Entomologist story
Burghduff wanted to dog fly problem tackled

 August 18, 1941 "Sunday night I drove to the Old Dutch Tavern for a steak. It was fair and I met Mr. Bergdorf who had a collection of heads and skins from Alaska. I found that he had spent about the same amount of time up there as you and I. He went north from Fairbanks to Point Barrow. I drove back by Panama City Beach and listened to Mr. Weir toot his trumpet. He isn’t as good as Walter White thinks he is." http://walterandina.com/archives/tag/entomology.html


Ben Windham, an editor at the TUSCALOOSA NEWS, died Sunday. In 2008, Ben reviewed Wilbur Walton, Jr.'s CD, MR. REDBUD in the Tuscaloosa News.  It's a great article so, in memory of Ben, I'm posting it. Would somebody out there in FACEBOOK LAND please print Ben's review and take it over and give it to Wilbur? I'm sure he's never seen it and I believe he'd appreciate reading it. http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/news/20080523/walton-back-after-almost-40-years

http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/news/20180220/longtime-columnist-ben-windham-dies-at-68

a transcription of a Friday, July 11, 2008  Tuscaloosa's WTBC Morning Show featuring
Wilbur Walton Jr., Tiger Jack, Wally Price & the late Big Dave McDaniel with Special Guests, Rodney Justo, the late Buddy Buie ,the late Johnny Wyker and Debbie Hendrickson O'Toole(many of Debbie's comments were inadvertently not recorded) http://robertoreg.blogspot.com/2015_08_09_archive.html

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

My name is Robert Register and I'm doing a presentation on THE OLD DUTCH in Panama City next month. I'm basically going to go over an article I wrote five years ago and expand upon my mistakes or misconceptions along with what's been discovered. Frank Tanton said you might have some memories of the Old Dutch. Please check out my 2013 article and please comment or share your memories.
http://panamacityliving.com/roadhouse-blues-at-the-old-dutch/

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Thomas Crumpton Moonpieplace I've heard it said that "Beach Music" (Carolina Beach Music) died Dec. 31, 1969. This was the music of Myrtle Beach, P.C. and the Old Dutch. One of the last great "beach music" songs, Be Young, Be Foolish, Be Happy, had begun to fade. It was written by the late Ray Whitley and JR Cobb. It was the consummate type of beach and frat party music. As The Beatles, Clapton, Hendrix, etc. began to take over in the late '60's, a whole new rock n roll fever turned from beach parties to rock festivals. I know the RGs, a beach music band, tried to change in that direction, to no avail. Don't get me wrong, I loved Clapton and Hendrix, I just couldn't play it well. In '68, I felt it coming. I went with the RGs to Calif. in '68, but it just didn't work out. That's when I stopped being a professional musician and just became a fan of rocknroll. Music was turned upside down. After '68, I never went back to the Old Dutch. Don't know what was being played at the beach in '68. Instead, I went to the Pop fests in Atlanta in '69 and '70 and became an ABB fan. But, you know, now as a vinyl record collector and seller, I love all of it. Long live rock n roll......."you take some music, music....free flowing music"........sing it Sonny Grier.


As I prepare for my presentation on THE OLD DUTCH next month, I'm trying to describe how highly influential Hendrix and Clapton were to the type of music played in the Southeast during the Summer of '68. Here's my first stab at it and I'd appreciate ALL COMMENTS :
"50 years ago, in the winter of '68, entertainers playing the southeastern club circuit were putting together their set lists for another summer season but it wasn't gonna be easy divining the future of musical entertainment in the Gulf South. Hendrix had released ARE YOU EXPERIENCED and Cream had finally broken through with DISRAELI GEARS. Suddenly, things didn't seem so certain for the future of the rhythmic horn arrangements so popular in the mid-Sixties world of blue-eyed soul music and frat-rock. The blaring horn sections of bands that had become a standard in the beach music scene were giving way to rhythm sections which supported the GUITAR GOD. Change was in the air...."


The impact of the Stones' SATISFACTION upon the sale of fuzz boxes in 1965 (from Wikipedia) : "The group re-recorded it two days later at RCA Studios in Hollywood, California, with a different beat and the Maestro fuzzbox adding sustain to the sound of the guitar riff.[8][9] Richards envisioned redoing the track later with a horn section playing the riff: "this was just a little sketch, because, to my mind, the fuzz tone was really there to denote what the horns would be doing."[8] The other Rolling Stones, as well as producer and manager Andrew Loog Oldham and sound engineer David Hassinger eventually outvoted Richards and Jagger so the track was selected for release as a single.[9][10] The song's success boosted sales of the Gibson fuzzbox so that the entire available stock sold out by the end of 1965."

FROM EL ROD of THE QUARRYMEN (later with RABBIT BRANCH): The set list we played summer of 69 in the Old Dutch, in addition to Satisfaction and The Last Time, included These Eyes, One is the Loneliest Number, Keep Me Hanging On, Proud Mary, It’s Not Unusual, Time Has Come Today, Sittin’ on the Dock, and of course the standard Wilson Picket, Smokey, Otis tunes, complete with Shout to finish the night/morning!


John Curry's description of Eddie Hinton's (2018 posthumous inductee into the ALABAMA MUSIC HALL OF FAME) summer at the OLD DUTCH.  : In the Spring of ' 65 an opportunity developed for the band that changed us and Eddie forever. There was a club down on Panama City Beach called the Old Dutch Inn. It was the college hangout. All the hot local bands and a lot of regional and national bands wound up being featured there from time-to-time. We were rehearsing one day when Eddie showed up, all excited. He said,"Aw, man, this is it! They want us to be the house band for the summer. They're going to pay us one hundred dollars each per week and give us free food and lodging! This is our break, guys! We're fixin' to bust out of here!"
Well, Chiz had just graduated and was also married and had a son. He had to do a tour in the army and was to report to Ft. Jackson as a second Lieutenant in August, having been in the ROTC. Viet Nam was also heating up. As for me, I had graduated in ' 63, gotten married, became a father, and we had just opened Curry furniture store that spring. We couldn't take the job no matter what.
Eddie was real disappointed and he said, "Well you just can't do this to me. I'm going to go down there and figure out something. I'll be back in the Fall." Fall was our "season". We played fraternity parties and clubs and we had booked a great number of jobs already for the coming season.

Well, Eddie went down to Panama City Beach and put together a band and took the job at The Old Dutch Inn. He called the group the Five Minutes. He never came back to the Spooks.



a correction from Paul Hornsby,"Well, there's a small error in John Curry's time line. "The 5 Minutes" group wasn't formed by Eddie Hinton. We (The Minutes) formed in the summer of 1964. I was in a band called "The Pacers". We were supposed to play the Old Dutch that summer but the band broke up a week or so before that gig started. I, with a couple of other band members searched around and found Johnny Sandlin and Charlie Campbell up in Decatur, Ala. We struck out for the gulf coast searching for a gig for the summer. We were too late to get the Old Dutch job. We actually, never got to play there. We named the band "The 5 Minutes" and went over to Pensacola where we landed a job at the Pensacola Beach Casino. We played at the Casino that summer plus the following summer of 1965, when we added Eddie Hinton. In 1966 we trimmed the band down to a 4 piece and played the Pensacola Beach Spanish Village. That fall, we took the group on the road, playing club dates all over the south and midwest. We broke up early in 1967, with Eddie moving to Muscle Shoals to become a session player".

from Bill Elrod:  The set list we played summer of 69 in the Old Dutch, in addition to Satisfaction and The Last Time, included These Eyes, One is the Loneliest Number, Keep Me Hanging On, Proud Mary, It’s Not Unusual, Time Has Come Today, Sittin’ on the Dock, and of course the standard Wilson Picket, Smokey, Otis tunes, complete with Shout to finish the night/morning!
50 years ago, in the winter of '68, entertainers playing the southeastern club circuit were putting together their set lists for another summer season but it wasn't gonna be easy divining the future of musical entertainment in the Gulf South. Hendrix had released ARE YOU EXPERIENCED? and Cream had finally broken through with DISRAELI GEARS and things didn't seem so certain for the future of the rhythmic horn arrangements so popular in the world of blue-eyed soul music and frat-rock. The blaring horn sections of bands that had become a standard in the beach music scene were giving way to rhythm sections which supported the GUITAR GOD. Change was in the air....

Saturday, February 17, 2018

John Covach, a music professor and director of the Institute for Popular Music at the University of Rochester, adds that Hendrix's ear -- his ability to mesh feedback, backward recording and high amplification with rock's basic musical structures -- would be notable in any age. And along with Eric Clapton, Hendrix helped invent that virtuoso we call the "guitar hero," he adds.
"After (them), every guitar player wanted to have a solo, and guitar soloing and virtuosity (were) thought of as a central feature of rock music," he says. "Before that, Keith Richards' guitar solos, George Harrison's guitar solos, Roger McGuinn's guitar solos -- (they were) not really features of the tunes." Perhaps some instrumental artists, such as Duane Eddy or the Ventures, had a little of that touch, he says, but it wasn't until the extended jams of Hendrix and Clapton that solos became a mainstay of rock.
 August 18, 1941 "Sunday night I drove to the Old Dutch Tavern for a steak. It was fair and I met Mr. Bergdorf who had a collection of heads and skins from Alaska. I found that he had spent about the same amount of time up there as you and I. He went north from Fairbanks to Point Barrow. I drove back by Panama City Beach and listened to Mr. Weir toot his trumpet. He isn’t as good as Walter White thinks he is." http://walterandina.com/archives/tag/entomology.html
I'm working on my STATEMENT on the Old Dutch's place in the history of rock. Here's the first sentence I've come up with. " In the late Sixties, the Old Dutch became a famed rock club on the southeast circuit but the young musicians who coveted those gigs @ PCB's oldest beach bar soon discovered that all their endurance would soon be tested when they contracted to do 8 shows a week with Mondays off."


During the summer of ’65, a beach music classic was born on the dance floor of The Old Dutch. A band from South Alabama called the K-Otics were playing one week and during their breaks they visited the nearby Old Hickory where the Swingin’ Medallions were performing. The K-Otics loved “Double Shot of My Baby’s Love” and asked the Medallions if they planned to record it. The Medallions said, ”No,” so the K-Otics laid plans to cut the record. Later in the fall, the Medallions had a change of heart and recorded “Double Shot”. Both the Swingin’ Medallions and the K-Otics released their versions in the spring of ’66. The K-Otics had a regional hit and the Medallions’ record went national and the rest is history. Bruce Springsteen called “Double Shot”, “the greatest fraternity rock song of all time.” Columnist Bob Greene called it “the ultimate get-drunk-and-throw-up song. You heard it in every juke box in every bar in the world.” In 1993, Louis Grizzard wrote, ”Even today, when I hear ‘Double Shot of My Baby’s Love’, it makes me want to stand outside in the hot sun with a milkshake cup full of beer in one hand and a slightly drenched coed in the other.”

Exotic dancers continued to perform during the Sixties but the “bread and butter” performers during the season were rock and roll bands composed of young guys in their late teens and early twenties. Any dreams they ever had of a summer filled with sun, surf, sand, beer and bikinis were crushed when they realized their schedule included at least eight sessions a week and as many as twelve a week during the week of July 4. Guitar players regularly changed out their strings every week from the wear that was enhanced by the salt air and sweat. These young musicians had to be dedicated and determined to show the world that they were special. During July 4th week, multiple bands were hired and after 1971, live entertainment began every day at noon and went on in continuous four hour shifts until 4 A.M. in the morning.
There was no such thing as a fire code in The Old Dutch and the dance hall often looked like a smoke filled cavern; packed to the walls, shoulder to shoulder. More than one musician who played there has made this remark using the same words, ”I didn’t know you could get that many people in a room.”

You grew up fast when you played The Old Dutch. Many a teenage guitar player witnessed his first striptease act standing behind the stripper while providing her with the music to which she was dancing. Many of the cocktail waitresses and Go-Go girls didn’t appreciate male affection and many musicians first witnessed their first open “display of affection” between a same-sex couple when the waitress’ short-haired “boyfriend” came to pick her up dressed in madras shirt, pressed khakis and penny loafers. The first time many a Tri-State male saw a woman go out in public without wearing a bra was at The Old Dutch. To craft your first fake I.D. and use it to get into The Old Dutch was a Gulf Coast rite of passage."

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

"Dauphin Island is Alabama. I don't understand the 'Louisiana'. "

Alabama is a concept that came into being only 200 years ago. DAUPHIN ISLAND has been inhabited by Europeans for over 300 years. DAUPHIN ISLAND IS THE MOTHER SETTLEMENT FOR EVERY EARLY TOWN IN LOUISIANA, ALABAMA AND MISSISSIPPI. It may even be considered the mother settlement for NORTHWEST FLORIDA because the only reason the site of Pensacola was occupied by the Spanish in 1698 was to stop the French who declined to fight the Spanish and settled at Dauphin Island in 1699. Later the French from Dauphin Island CONQUERED Pensacola but gave it back to the Spanish in 1722 under the terms of the peace that terminated the war that broke out in 1719. The continuous recorded history of the entire Gulf Coast after 200 years of failed attempts at colonization essentially begins with Iberville's landing here in January of 1699. By 1702, Dauphin Island was the governmental and military center for the entire colony of La Louisiane. By the time Crozat received his contract for a monopoly on trade from King Louis XIV in 1712, Dauphin Island was the ONLY geographic place name mentioned in the entire document which defines the boundaries of Louisiana and how they project from a single place: Dauphin Island. Crozat's Contract was the legal basis for all of America's claims from THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE. As early as 1758, the great Louisiana historian Du Pratz wrote that Mobile was the birthplace of Louisiana and that Dauphin Island was the cradle. Since time immemorial, prehistoric man traveling down the Mississippi River and destined for Dauphin Island would leave the river at the present-day location of New Orleans in order to take advantage of the route through the lakes. On New Year's Eve-2017 , New Orleans kicked off their TRICENTENNIAL commemorating 300 years since Bienville and his men left Dauphin Island in 1718 on their voyage to break ground on Louisiana's newest municipality:La Nouvelle-Orléans . In his first words of his Dauphin Island history, Professor Richebourg McWilliams wrote, "With the exception of Cuba, Dauphin is, historically, the most prominent and interesting island in the Gulf of Mexico."
Dauphin Island's first 100 years make it the STRATEGIC FOCUS of an amazing story of how two Catholic countries, France and Spain, reconciled their differences in order to try to stop the English.